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Announcing Rubicon Theatre Company’s
Summer Education Program 2021!

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AUDITION FAQ AND TIPS

WHAT TO PREPARE

Theatre Camp

Auditioning students should be prepared to sing 32 bars of a musical theatre song. Choose something you feel good singing and bring sheet music, as an accompanist will be provided. You may be asked to sing a second selection so it’s best to prepare both an up-tempo and a ballad. The most important thing is to choose material you enjoy singing.

Fearless Shakespeare

Auditioning students interested in Fearless Shakespeare should prepare one Shakespearean monologue. If this will be your first time auditioning with this type of material, don’t let it stop you. We have a collection of Shakespeare monologues that can be found on the Documents page. Remember this is a program where you’ll learn how to handle the language so don’t feel as if you should already know how. Enthusiasm and commitment are what’s needed for this course.

Musical Theatre Production Workshop

Auditioning students should be prepared to sing 32 bars of either an uptempo or a ballad. An accompanist will be provided so please bring sheet music and sing something from a published musical theatre piece. An audition is your moment to shine so choose songs you love to sing.

WHAT TO BRING

An up-to-date picture
Your picture does not need to be a professional headshot, merely something that has been taken recently and will help us to remember you after you’ve left the room. Please note that we will be taking your picture at the audition as well as videotaping throughout the audition process.

A Resume (a list of shows/roles you’ve performed)

Prior experience is not required, so don’t let lack of a resumé keep you away. This program is all about learning the ropes.

Your sheet music, if you’re auditioning for a musical

If this is your first time auditioning for a musical, you may wonder where to find your sheet music. There are many online companies that sell digital downloads of sheet music. Often they will even offer access to multiple keys so you can choose one best suited to your range.

Your best attitude!

GENERAL AUDITION TIPS

Here are the 13 tips for auditioning for theatre.

1. DO YOUR HOMEWORK, BE PREPARED
There's very little you will have control over once you enter the audition room. Making sure that you're fully prepared with your audition material is the first step in making sure you're comfortable and confident. That includes keeping up with singing, acting, and dance classes.

2. ONLY WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF
Don't waste your time sizing up the other kids in the lobby auditioning for the same project. Trust that you were called in to audition for a reason, and trust that you're just as worthy for the show as everyone else auditioning.  

3. IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, THAT'S OK
Nobody’s perfect. We're all human and everyone forgets a line or misses a note now and then. Don't worry about it. Even the best actors and actresses on Broadway make mistakes, and they learn from their mistakes for the next audition. If given the opportunity to start again, go for it and don't get nervous. And don’t make excuses.

4. DON'T SING SONGS OUT OF YOUR VOCAL RANGE
It never does any good if you challenge yourself with a song that you're not ready for. Just because there are songs on the radio that you love to sing, that doesn't mean they are the best fit for your voice. Make sure whatever song you sing sits comfortably in your vocal range. 

5. CHOOSE A SONG THAT’S AGE/GENRE APPROPRIATE
If you're going in for a classic musical theatre show, don't sing a pop song. And vice-versa!. Also, it's always smart to sing songs that are age-appropriate. It shows that you know who you are.

6. DRESS COMFORTABLY AND PROFESSIONALLY
You should never show up "in costume”. Wear a comfortable outfit that's appropriate for the specific role you're auditioning for. Remember, it's similar to a business interview, so you don't want to come dressed like you don't care about how you look.

7. BE NICE TO EVERYONE:
There's never any reason to be anything but pleasant to everyone you see at auditions. That doesn't just include the people behind the table. It includes the accompanist, the other kids in the lobby, the monitor, etc. 

8. DON'T GIVE UP EASILY:
A lot of people in the entertainment industry will turn you down and tell you that you're not quite right for what they are looking for. That doesn't mean you'll never get cast. The more you work on your acting, singing, and dancing, the bigger your chances are that you'll eventually land a great part. 

9. READ THE CASTING BREAKDOWN CAREFULLY
Be sure to read through all the information provided on the casting breakdown. For example, if it says, “Don’t sing a cappella” or “Don’t sing to karaoke tracks” – then don’t show up to the audition believing that the casting people will allow you to do do it. Even if they do, it will lead them to believe you can’t follow directions.

10. HELP THE ACCOMPANIST HELP YOU
For your musical audition, make sure you have your sheet music clearly marked, in the correct key, and that it is in a binder so it’s easy to turn pages. Also, stay away from songs that are too challenging for an accompanist to sight-read. If you’re not sure, ask a piano player if they think it might be to difficult to sight-read. Also, before you begin your audition, take the time to make sure the accompanist knows where you are beginning and ending the song, and what the tempo is. Also let them know if there are any additional musical markings, retards, tempo changes, keys changes etc. that they should be aware of. If the music is too challenging, but you just have to do it, you may want to consider bringing in your own accompanist.

11. DON’T LOOK AT THE PEOPLE YOU ARE AUDITIONING FOR
There are always exceptions, but in my experience it’s best not to look at the casting panel. They’re there to do a job; assess your ability and appropriateness for the role. They’re not there to be your audience. It’s best to choose I spot/area over their heads that you can designate as the person you are talking/singing to. This will allow them to do their job and you’ll be able to do yours - which is to tell the story in the monologue or song . Don’t worry if they like you or not.

12. DO MORE THAN JUST ACT, SING AND DANCE:
Directors like it when performers are involved in more than just acting, singing, and dancing. It's always great to hear that kids focus on playing sports, playing a musical instrument, or commit to other hobbies. Being well-rounded is always a good thing, it will come in handy later on in life, too!

13. HAVE FUN:
If you're not having fun when auditioning, then you shouldn't be doing it.